Using Karate On Myself

karate ladies

I’ve found out a lot about myself in the past six months since I began training in Karate again.  I suspect I’m in for more surprises both pleasant and unpleasant.  I’ve had one person ask, “Have you ever had to use Karate on someone?”  I think the answer is, “Yes – I’ve had to use it on myself!”  I say that because so far, I have been my own worst enemy.  That said, I’ve taken some baby steps in the right direction and I’d like to share them with you.

Knocking Out Self doubt

Assuming you’re not suicidal, would you deliberately ingest poison?  An absurd thought, right?  Well, that’s what self doubt does.  It poisons your spirit.  It took months for me to get over self doubt and resume Karate training after some 27 years away from the dojo.  After quite a bit of wheedling and coaxing from three Senseis and my daughter, I decided to give it a try.  Sure I about died during warm up, sure I flapped around like a spastic duck, but after that first class, I stopped drinking the poisons.  I stopped thinking of myself as old and medically unfit.  My performance was laughable, but trying – simply trying – was a triumph.  Over time, I discovered if I start doubting myself, I should try to engage the challenge.  I might fall flat on my face, but then again, I might be pleasantly surprised.  For instance, I found out at Gasshuku (extended training over a weekend) my endurance is way better than I thought.

Leg Sweeping the Bad Attitude

I used to have a bad attitude about sparring.  I’d tense up, throw sloppy technique, get clobbered, be short of breath, and walk away sulking.  Yes, I’m way old enough to know better, LOL.  My daughter and I were visiting a sister dojo a couple months ago.  The Sensei there called for two-against-one sparring.  Sensei gave some guidelines, then my teenage daughter and a new friend gleefully looked at me.

My daughter said, “Let’s get her!”

I didn’t much like sparring, was not all that good at it, and Sensei was asking for two against one sparring.  To top it off, there were two teenage girls grinning mischievously at me!  Suddenly I realized how ridiculous this really was, and I had to laugh.  It was like light was infusing my soul, and something dark was slinking away never to be seen again.  I had tons of fun.  My daughter literally kicked my butt, and she and I still laugh about it.  Best of all, analyzing it later, I figured out gosh, there really is a connection between kata and kumite.  Fighting against two was more like kata, that’s probably one of the reasons I enjoyed it so much!  Since then, I’ve been a lot more willing to work on my kumite skills – which is good because, well, um… I need to build those skills.

Sparring with Circumstances

If I ever have to fight for my life, I’m going to have to learn that circumstances won’t always be in my favor.  The very first workout at Gasshuku, the sun was in my eyes.  I told myself to deal with it because maybe that might happen in a real fight.  During promotion at Gasshuku, I slipped on dewy grass a few times.  I told myself to keep going – I won’t always be able to choose the terrain.  In fact, I’d already practiced kata a few times on sand and shingle, so slipping wasn’t anything new.  At home, I hesitated at the idea of practicing karate in the garage because of the hard concrete.  Then I hit upon the idea of training in what I wear every day – shoes and all because that’s probably the most likely scenario for a fight.  I seriously doubt an attacker would let me pull a gi out of my purse as I run to the nearest telephone booth to change!  Likewise, with each new little owie (including a contact lens going wonky after a tap to the eye), I told myself to just keep on because everything I experienced could happen in a real fight for survival – that and more.  Granted, sometimes we are overcome.  For that situation, I’ll refer you to my article on Success (trust me on this).

 

Bowing to Leadership Responsibilities

“Hi, is our Water Fitness instructor going to be here?”  I asked the Aquatics Manager as I dripped my way into her poolside office.

“No, she called in sick.  Would you like the list of exercises?”

I thanked the manager as I took the laminated printout from her hand and stepped back to the pool.  My daughter and I started the workout as people started showing up for class.  I explained in simple English the teacher was sick and I had a list of exercises.

“You teach!”  A Hispanic woman who doesn’t speak much English piped up, smiling trustingly at me.

Three or four more ladies who don’t speak much English overheard the first lady’s request.  They all smiled at me, looking at me expectantly.  I drew in a deep breath as I realized all of us had driven or bussed to the Y, changed into swimsuits (with some body types this is a challenge), showered, endured cold air and cold water…  If nothing else, we needed to generate some body heat!  I smiled and said, “OK.”  I proceeded to lead by example and demonstration (often hopping out of the water) while working with the additional challenge of language barriers.  Ever since then, I’ve been the substitute teacher for Water Fitness class.

Just the other day our instructor was sick again, but this time I wasn’t able to get the outline of the workout.  The ladies asked me to lead anyway.  They trusted me more than I trusted myself.  I was surprised to find I remembered almost everything.

Why do they look to me for leadership?  I’m so very different from most of them! I’m one of the younger members, I’m white, comparatively athletic, and I speak only English fluently.  I think I have an inkling thanks to a good article about character qualities that Martial Arts gives us.  You can read Jaro Berce’s article, “Learning Leadership from Martial Arts – II” if you want to learn more.  It seems people are drawn to these characteristics.  This is sometimes difficult for an introvert like me!  I define introvert as someone who expends energy while with others and thus is drained after awhile, as opposed to an extrovert – one who gains energy from everyone around them.

As an introvert, my first inclination was to deny the empathy I felt with these ladies about the situation, to shy away from the responsibility and to not use the gifts I’ve been given to lead the class.  These ladies are struggling with some severe medical issues – weight, pain, surgeries, arthritis…  What kind of person am I if I’m in a position to help and I ignore their needs?  I’d undermine my personal development for sure if I avoided my responsibility.

What’s Next?

I expect I’ve quite a lot ahead of me, and maybe it’s best that I don’t know everything that I will face in the years to come!  I’m sure most of you black belts are chuckling and saying, “Wait until she has to deal with students!” and some of the rest of you black belts are poking the others in the ribs and saying, “No, wait until she has to deal with some of the students’ parents!”  I’m laughing at the thought, and I’m very grateful I have a few years to develop the skills I will need!

The Core of Your Self

bodybuilder
Yowza!

Definitions of the word “core” include references to centrality and importance.  If I understand correctly, the core muscles are the muscles in your trunk both front and back but not necessarily the shoulders.  They support your spine.  You exercise those muscles when you do leg lifts, crunches, and (ugh) pushups.  In karate, we punch and kick from the core – our legs and arms snap like whipped towels if we throw the techniques properly from the core.  Just as your body has a core, your spirit has a core as well.  Most of what we do comes from the core.

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A good place to see what the core of a person looks like is in a nursing home.  Everything superficial is gone.  Careers are over.  Any fame won is largely forgotten by the general public.  No one looks like the chiseled young people you see in swimsuit advertisements.  Health is by and large gone.  Some are as helpless as newborn babies.  What’s left after all has been stripped away by the ravages of old age?  The core of who they are.  It’s sobering to see one elder bitter and unhappy while another is still smiling and blessing the socks off of everyone within hearing.  Even when someone is afflicted with Alzheimer’s, the core of who they once were peeks through for a fleeting moment every once in awhile.

 

Personal development is key to strengthening your core.  Martial arts are valuable for developing physical and mental control.  Spiritual activities (for example: church worship services) have proven their value throughout the ages and across cultures.  There are many ways to work on your core.  It is vital that you do so.  Someday you might find everything else stripped away.

Here in America, we are celebrating Thanksgiving today.  Being thankful is one of many very powerful ways of developing your core.  Even if you’re heartbroken and crying today, find a way to be thankful for the gift of tears because crying is a healing process.  Look outside the window.  Even gloomy skies and rain are a blessing – just ask anyone who lives in a desert.  If you’re out in that cold, gloomy rain, please seek out warmth and fellowship – shelters throw their doors wide open today and you’ll definitely find plenty to be thankful for – maybe even a bit of hope for your future.  If you can find one little thing to be thankful for, you’ll start to get better at finding more things.  Your “core” will get stronger.

 

If you want to explore the core of yourself further, Sensei Andrea Harkins has a great article that goes deeper and gives specific steps to help you think about what she calls “The Genuine You.”  Don’t worry – you don’t have to spend hours of meditation contemplating your bellybutton, but Sensei Andrea will make you think!  She also has a related post about seeking something you can be passionate about.   The great thing about passions is they come from your “core” and nourish your spirit at the same time!

What does the core of your self look like?  What are you made of?

Two Beginnings: My Story

This is in response to an article by Troy Seeling posted on Jackie Bradbury’s blog – Click here to read it!

When I was 13 my parents shoved a Parks & Recreation catalog at me and told me to find something to do.  I tried Karate because I was curious – would I be breaking boards within a week?  What did karate people do anyway?  I was also having trouble with bullies at school.  From the first few minutes I was hooked.  I felt stronger every class, so that kept me at it.  I wasn’t thrilled about doing Karate only twice a week and taking three-week breaks between quarters. My Dad looked into other dojo(s) and found one that met nearly every day.  I spent 3 or 4 years training hard.

My Sensei honored me by asking me to help teach the little kids’ class.  I enjoyed it, but I started getting sick.  All the time.  I even got chicken pox that year!  My training went to pot and my grades at school were in jeopardy from all my absences.  I got so discouraged I quit altogether.  I wish I had simply bowed out of teaching little kids, then I would’ve been fine.  But I was a dumb mixed-up emotional teenage girl and didn’t think of that.  Years went by and I did next to nothing for exercise.  Life happened, I went to college out of state, kids came along, yada yada.

When my kids were little I spent a good deal of time bed-ridden because of illnesses they dragged home.  When my kids were a little older and not bringing in the germs as much, I tried teaching Sunday School at church.  I would always be sick by Thursday.  My doctor did some testing and found out I have IgG subclass 2 deficiency – a fancy way of saying that my body simply does not produce enough of one of the germ-fighting substances the body uses to fight off illness.  So far this winter, I’ve been healthy, but all the kids in my current dojo are old enough to stay home when sick and they practice good hygiene.  That wasn’t the case with the little kids I used to teach when I was a teenager.

I know now I need to be very clear about my future in karate – I have particular dojos in mind where I would love to eventually teach because the demographics are favorable to my condition 🙂

My daughter started training in September 2013 at the community college, took both quarters then continued at the local YMCA.  Secretly I was eating my heart out every time I went to pick my daughter up from karate.  I’d often come early just to watch her.  Sometimes I’d meet her for the light lunch she’d eat before class, and I’d watch the entire class.  I volunteered at tournaments and felt stabs of regret.  I was proud but jealous at promotions.

I had my excuses.  Some I shared, some I didn’t.  My daughter and three Senseis persisted in their efforts to get me on the mats again.  The straw that broke the camel’s back came after a tournament and pizza party in early June of this year.  My daughter said, “You could help me with kata and I could help you with kumite!”

Two days later I was back on the mats.  It was a birthday surprise for my daughter.  I dropped her off at the door of the Y as usual, then parked the car, ran into the locker room, and changed clothes.  The look on her face when I showed up in a gi was priceless.

I survived.  I knew I’d get in shape eventually, so I persisted.  I found that a few things I’d been concerned about shouldn’t have kept me from training again because they simply aren’t a problem.  I’ve re-claimed my love for karate.  I don’t feel middle-aged when I’m in class.  I feel young, capable, and strong.

I keep on practicing because as an adult, I see there are depths and dimensions to the art that I wasn’t able to grasp as a teenager.  There’s enough to keep me busy for as long as I am able to do Karate.  This weekend, I was privileged to be able to watch brown belts earn their black belts.  Among them was a 70 year old gentleman.  If he can do it, I can too.

 

The Perfect Moment

141016_Image1One of my hobbies is photography.  I haven’t yet found out who coined the term “the perfect moment.”  Experienced photographers know when they’ve hit the shutter button at the perfect moment.  It’s a sort of “knowing” that you feel deep inside the core of your self.  The “perfect moment” is the instant you know every element is in place – shutter speed, aperture setting, lighting, composition, focus, and the subject – especially if the subject is in motion like Grumpy Rooster.

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You hit the shutter button at the right time and there’s your next prizewinner.  Miss that moment or worse yet leave your camera at home and it’s a real bummer.  But is that moment really “perfect?”  I can look at my top twelve images and pick apart every single one of them.  I could lose confidence about my photography.  Is there room for improvement in my photography?  Absolutely.  Are there better photographers than I?  Oh yes.  So for the sake of my sanity, I’ll define “perfect moment” as my personal best – far beyond my average.

Karate has its own “perfect moments.”  It’s when you feel all the elements are there – timing, position, breathing, stance, target, kime…  and you’ve nailed the technique or at least you’ve come as close to perfect as you can given your current level of training.  It feels awesome especially if it’s something you’re doing with a training partner.  For me in karate, “perfect moments” are exceedingly rare.  I’m a beginner so that’s to be expected.  I know all you black belts reading this are chuckling right now – remember, I’m defining “perfect moment” as “far beyond my average,” not, “grand-master standard.”  In photography, I get “perfect moments” fairly frequently.  What’s the difference?  A little over two decades of experience versus four months of training.  Frequent practice vs. writing blogs when I should be practicing (Please excuse me while I do ten pushups for that admission!  Ichi…  ni…  san…)

Do “perfect moments” come easily to me as a photographer now that I’ve developed the technical knowledge and the instincts to capture them?  Not always.  Sometimes I do just happen to be at the right place at the right time and I nail it.  More often than not I get cricks in my neck and back while taking about 20 or 30 frames of the same stupid daisy.

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Passers-by have probably wondered about the strange lady contorting herself and muttering to her camera for fifteen minutes at a time.  I have a confession: the vast majority of frames I take suck.  That’s why I often spend time contorting myself to get a different perspective, constantly adjusting the camera settings and the composition of the picture for each frame.  I take lots of frames.  One of those frames might be worth the effort.  Sucking at photography used to be expensive back in the days of film.

Imagine if you had to pay money every time you made a mistake in the dojo.  That’s what had to be done with photography in the “old days” of film – you had to buy rolls of film, pay to have them developed, pay for prints, and maybe if you were lucky you might have one truly amazing photo in a roll.  Digital photography has freed me to make more mistakes – therefore I am better able to work on technical stuff, to experiment with composition, and to make sure I get the most out of each subject.  Now that I don’t have to deal with film I have loads more “perfect moments” because I have far fewer constraints on the art of taking pictures.  Guess what – sucking has always been free in karate.  Yes, you do have to pay for your class time, but even if you’re amazing, you still go to class, right?  Right?  The correct answer, by the way, is a resounding “Yes!”  As long as you have the time to do so, you are free to make loads of mistakes, to work on technical stuff, to experiment, and to make sure you understand and explore every movement.  There’s really no shortcut – it takes work, time and patience to get “perfect moments.”

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I can hear the protests, “If you suck at taking pictures, there’s PhotoShop and GIMP!”  I am proficient in GIMP, and I can tell you that there’s really no way to make a purse out of a sow’s ear.  It’s much easier to tweak an image that is mostly good.  It’s even better when I don’t have to edit at all.  There is no substitute for a decent photo.  Karate doesn’t have PhotoShop.  Nobody’s going to wave a magic wand and make your belt turn the next color.  You can’t get by with sloppy kihon, half-hearted kata, or lousy kumite.  There’s no substitute for hard work and practice, for good technique, for the heart of a warrior (Buzz word! Ten more pushups for me!), and for years and years of time to develop your skills.  I’m told I must get used to sucking in karate and yes, even feel good about sucking.  I believe it because of my experience with photography.  Still, I love those “perfect moments” and I hope to have more of them as time goes by.

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Cross Post – A Parent’s Guide to the Martial Arts by Jackie Bradbury

Last week I gave a nod to Jackie’s article.  This week, I’m cross-posting the article!  Thank you, Jackie, for cross-posting my article last week – I really appreciate it!

Jackie Bradbury publishes “The Stick Chick“. You can find Jackie on Google Plus (+Jackie Bradbury) Twitter (@JackieB23), Pinterest, Tumblr and on Facebook

Saturday, March 22, 2014

A Parent’s Guide to the Martial Arts

Mommy’s Little Badass,
about six years old.

I’m a martial artist, but I’m also the parent of a martial artist.  In fact, I’ve been a martial arts mom far longer than I’ve been a martial artist myself, and I anticipate my younger child will be stepping onto a mat within a year or so.

I believe that most, if not all, children can benefit from studying a martial art. Which martial art – and which school – is highly variable, based upon the skill sets and temperament of your child.

If you are considering putting your child in a martial art, here’s some tips I’ve learned that I hope will help you.

First, read this excellent post written by +Jesse EnkampHow To Be A Good Karate Parent.

Make sure you have a good understanding of  your child’s emotional, physical, and mental abilities and temperament.

  • Is your child outgoing, or shy?
  • Is your child aggressive, or passive?
  • Is your child physically gifted or not so much?
  • Is your child able to pay attention for long periods of time (20 minutes or more) or not?
  • Is your child “high strung” and intense, or laid back and loose?
  • Is your child emotionally sensitive, or not?
  • Is your child a perfectionist who needs things “just so”, or she just “goes with the flow” of things?
  • Is your child goal oriented, or not?
  • Does your child have physical, emotional or mental special needs?
  • Is your child especially sensitive to people getting inside their personal space, or are they fine with touching and being touched by other people in a sporting/martial arts context?
  • How much empathy does your child have?

For example, if your child is passive or shy, it’s probably not going to be too much fun for him to enroll in a school that does a lot of tournament and demonstration stuff, but if your child is a competitive over-achiever, she may get bored quickly with schools that are more laid back and intellectual.

Next, make sure you understand why you’re signing up little Junior for martial arts classes. Why do you want your child to take the martial arts?  Reasons may include:

  • Physical fitness
  • Positive effects on self-esteem
  • Self discipline
  • Learning moral values such as courage, perseverance, fair play, etc.
  • Helping your child learn how to protect herself against bullies or other people who wish her harm (i.e., self defense, but what that means for a kid is different than what it means for an adult)

One major benefit to the martial arts is that it can help out with other sports. Many NFL teams have hired martial arts trainers and coaches.  Four time Pro Bowler and two-time All Pro Outside Linebacker Tamba Hali for the Kansas City Chiefs is a Blue Belt in BJJ and studies with the Gracies.

One note about self defense:  I believe it is a bit irresponsible to teach young children self defense techniques that involve staying engaged with an attacker.  Kids that age should not exclusively be taught to trade blows and stay engaged in a fight.

I did not mention any specific art, as I don’t believe that the art itself is the primary reason you choose a school for your child.  Sure, we can debate grappling vs. stand up and all that stuff, and the utility of it all, but honestly, when you’re just starting out, make sure you pick the school that fits your child’s unique needs and your budget, not what somebody else insists is “the best” or right art.  Here’s a secret – each one of us is biased in favor of our own art, so take that into consideration.

When looking for a school, visit and watch the classes before you sign up for anything.  Talk to parents and see what they say they like and dislike about the school.  A good martial arts instructor will welcome this visit and examination.

Here are the big red flags to watch out for, in my opinion:

  • Very long contracts (more than 6 months). I am not
    Mommy’s Little Badass,
    age 13 and not far
    from her Black Belt.

    completely opposed to contracts on principle, but read the fine print VERY closely.  If they try to sell you some sort of big package immediately, and use high-pressure sales tactics, run away.

  • Hidden Fees.  These may include testing fees, belt fees (which are not unreasonable as long as they cover the cost of the belt), equipment fees, weapons fees, special uniforms, federation fees, and others.  Many of these are legitimate, but make sure they are being up front about it versus hiding or surprising you with it later.
  • Dirty or musty smelling training spaces in poor repair.  This school is either running out of money and will close soon, or they don’t care too much about the quality of what they teach.  A single broken mirror on the wall is not “poor repair” – they can be expensive and difficult to replace.  But falling down tiles, dirty mats, a bad smell are all hallmarks of a place you absolutely not allow your child to enter, much less train in.
  • Unprofessionalism.  Are teachers yelling at students, cursing, denigrating other arts or schools, treating parents with disrespect… basically engaging in any behavior that in any other context would be considered rude or poor customer service?  If so, run.
  • Flakiness.  When teacher doesn’t always show up or start class on time, where they don’t follow through on promises, where they don’t return phone calls and emails (it’s 2014 – YOU MUST USE EMAIL), where classes are run by very low level belts while the instructor talks on the phone or gossips with a parent on the sidelines, all that is being flaky. Avoid instructors like this, no matter how good a martial artist or nice person they are, as they will invariably disappoint you.
  • Poor teaching.  Just because one is an excellent martial artist, it does not necessarily equate to being a good teacher.  I am convinced there are more people teaching than really should be, because they think that you reach a certain rank and must strike out on your own and teach.  Hallmarks of poor teaching include no structure to class, no curriculum or clear process in which ones’ progress is measured and tested, and having high-level belts that still look clumsy and can’t move smoothly or with power.
Some final tips:
  • Don’t ignore Rec Center, Public Parks or YMCA martial arts programs, as they can actually be very good instruction, sometimes at a cheaper price than a stand-alone school.
  • Trust your gut.  If it feels wrong, it is wrong.
  • Do not allow your child to be alone with instructors without other trusted people around.  It’s unfortunate, but there are numerous reports of martial arts teachers abusing their students when they get them alone.  Also watch for inappropriate texts to your child’s phone.
  • It’s a good idea to survey prices for a variety of places to get an idea of “going rates” for martial arts in your area.  If a school you are considering is much more expensive or much less expensive than average, make sure you know why before you enroll your child there.
  • Research online reviews and check out Bullshido School Reviews.
  • YOU are the customer.
I hope this helps you pick a martial arts school and teacher for your child. Feel free to contact me [Jackie – not Joelle, LOL – info below] to ask questions!

 

Jackie Bradbury publishes “The Stick Chick“. You can find Jackie on Google Plus (+Jackie Bradbury) Twitter (@JackieB23), Pinterest, Tumblr and on Facebook